Judge Rules Against Drug Price Disclosure

In a very recent decision, a federal judge ruled against Trump Administration efforts to require drug manufacturers to include the price of prescription drugs in their television commercials. Filed in federal court in mid-June, the lawsuit claimed that HHS does not have the legal power to enforce the rule and that including prices will mislead patients and discourage them from seeking treatment. In the decision rendered on July 9th, U.S. District Court Judge Amit P. Mehta agreed, adding that the administration had overstepped its authority.

A spokesman for HHS was quoted as saying “we are disappointed in the court’s decision and will be working with the Department of Justice on next steps.” While the decision is a blow to the administration’s efforts to increase cost transparency and drive down drug prices, many expect their efforts to continue.

Fighting Specialty Drug Costs

Prescription-drugsTo help control rising specialty drug costs, the National Business Group on Health has issued a lengthy report including 5 public policy recommendations they hope will educate the marketplace and encourage effective, strategic partnerships.

According to NBGH officials, plan design is the key to managing the use of specialty prescriptions as well as the costs. The report details progress resulting from the aggressive use of utilization review, case management and prior authorization for specialty drugs. Other measures yielding positive results are the design of a specialty tier into the benefits plan and taking measures to administer specialty prescriptions in a facility separate from the hospital. Prescriptions authorized by a hospital or billed under the medical benefit are harder to track and often more costly.

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Drugs Drive Rising Costs

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While all treatment costs have risen consistently in the past 2 decades, the pharmaceutical sector has put up some amazing numbers. In 2011 alone, Americans spent an average of $985 per person, approximately twice the amount spent in other developed countries for the same benefit. In 2015, aggregate prescription drug sales in the U.S. totaled $374 billion – $190 billion more than other industrialized countries would have spent for a similar population.