It’s Never Too Early for Sunscreen

sip-sunscreenThe American Cancer Society reminds us that more skin cancers are diagnosed each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined. Most are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, most of which come from exposure to the sun. One thing to remember is that you don’t have to be spending a day at the pool to be at serious risk. Simply staying in the shade will make a huge difference. If you do want to catch some rays, slip on a shirt, wear a hat and apply sunscreen with a SPF value of 30 or more. UV blocking sunglasses will help protect the delicate skin around your eyes and help you avoid certain eye diseases as well.

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Women More Vulnerable to Stress

stressed-womenA study of nearly 700 individuals with coronary artery disease has revealed that hearts in men and women react differently to a temporary reduction in blood flow to heart muscles, a common symptom caused by stress. While some men may experience an increase in blood pressure and heart rate, making their heart work harder, about 1 in 5 women experienced constriction in their smaller blood vessels, which can cause more serious heart complications. American Heart Association representatives recommend physical exercise as a way to manage mental stress. Exercise will make blood vessels dilate, counteracting the constriction seen by some of the women who participated in the study. Regular exercise, like a daily walk or run, can go a long way in helping us cope with mental stress.

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Blood Free Glucose Monitors

diabetesThanks to a new system approved recently by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Medicare patients with diabetes are able to monitor their glucose levels without sticking their fingers. The first-of-its-kind system reads glucose levels through a sensor placed on the back of the upper arm. Sensors, which can be worn for 10 days, are priced at $36 while a handheld reader, placed over the sensor to obtain real-time readings, retails for about $70.

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Drug Overdose Deaths Rising

opioidsAccording to preliminary government data, U.S. deaths involving fentanyl and other synthetic opioids fueled a 21% jump in annual drug overdose deaths during 2017. The increase from 9,945 opioid deaths in 2016 to 20,145 during 2017 reflected the sharpest one-year increase since the U.S. began experiencing a widespread opioid addiction. CDC data shows that deaths involving heroin and prescription painkillers such as oxycodone, are also increasing.

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Are Costs Really Beyond Anyone’s Control?

In at least one big city, a major carrier is providing 100% coverage to public employees for MRIs, CT Scans and other imaging services only when free-standing, non-hospital based facilities are used. What do you know? Independent TPAs have been helping self-funded health plans do things like this for years.

Too many people have long considered rising health care costs to be a condition we simply must live with. Fact is there are alternatives, most of which can only be implemented when the plan’s best interests are first and foremost.

Detailed Reporting Needed

In contrast to a fully-insured plan or self-funding with a carrier-owned ASO, using an independent TPA enables the plan to make informed decisions based on detailed reporting – reporting that the plan owns.

There is no secret to controlling plan costs. It requires discipline and the tools to monitor individual parts of the plan, such as prescription drugs, imaging, chronic disease management and more. Analyzing expenditures such as these can yield huge savings over the course of a year, but only when your administrator is free of carrier or provider affiliations. Having checks and balances in place can make all the difference.

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