2016 ACA Transitional Reinsurance Program Form Now Available

The ‘ACA Transitional Reinsurance Program Annual Enrollment and Contributions Submission Form’ for the 2016 benefit year is now available. The form will be used by employers sponsoring certain self-insured plans that use a third-party administrator in connection with claims processing, claims adjudication, and enrollment functions (“contributing entities”) to make contributions required under the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) Transitional Reinsurance Program.

Reinsurance Contribution Process
To successfully complete the reinsurance contribution process, contributing entities (or third-party administrators or administrative services-only contractors on their behalf) must register on Pay.gov (or confirm a password if such entities registered for the previous benefit years of the program) and submit their annual enrollment counts of the number of covered lives of reinsurance contribution enrollees for the applicable benefit year using the form that is now available. All contributing entities must submit the 2016 Form and schedule reinsurance contribution payment(s) no later than Tuesday, November 15, 2016.

2016 Contribution Amounts

The 2016 reinsurance contribution rate is $27.00 per covered life. For the 2016 benefit year, contributing entities have the option to pay:

  • The entire 2016 benefit year contribution in one payment, no later than January 17, 2017 reflecting $27.00 per covered life; or
  • In two separate payments for the 2016 benefit year, with the first remittance due by January 17, 2017 reflecting $21.60 per covered life, and the second remittance due by November 15, 2017 reflecting $5.40 per covered life.

For more information on how to submit the 2016 Form, please click here.

Additional information on the reinsurance contribution process can be found in our Transitional Reinsurance Program section.

Medicare Part D Disclosure to Individuals Due by October 14

pay-or-play-delayedIn preparation for the Medicare fall open enrollment period, employers sponsoring group health plans that include prescription drug coverage are required to notify all Medicare-eligible individuals whether such coverage is “creditable” under the law. Creditable coverage means that the coverage is expected to pay, on average, as much as the standard Medicare prescription drug coverage.

Written Disclosure to Individuals
Employers can satisfy this notice requirement by providing a written disclosure notice annually by October 14, and at various other times as required under the law, to the following individuals:

  • Medicare-eligible active working individuals and their dependents (including a Medicare-eligible individual when he or she joins the group health plan);
  • Medicare-eligible COBRA individuals and their dependents;
  • Medicare-eligible disabled individuals covered under an employer’s prescription drug plan; and
  •  Any retirees and their dependents.

Model notices are available from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Online Disclosure to CMS Also Required
Additionally, employers are required to complete an online disclosure to CMS to report the creditable coverage status of their prescription drug coverage. This disclosure must be completed annually no later than 60 days from the beginning of a plan year, and at certain other times.

Our section on Medicare further details how the program impacts group health plans.


IRS Releases Final 2016 Forms 1094 and 1095

hr-news-alertThe Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released the final forms and instructions for Forms 1094 and 1095 for calendar year 2016 reporting. Employers are required to report in early 2017 for calendar year 2016.

Who is Required to Report
Applicable large employers (ALEs)—generally those with 50 or more full-time employees, including full-time equivalents (FTEs)—must use Forms 1094-C and 1095-C to report information to the IRS and to their full-time employees about their compliance with the employer shared responsibility provisions (“pay or play”) and the health care coverage they have (or have not) offered in a calendar year. Forms 1094-B and 1095-B are used by insurers, self-insuring employers, and other parties that provide minimum essential health coverage (regardless of size, except for large self-insuring employers) to report information on this coverage to the IRS and to covered individuals.

Employers subject to both reporting provisions (generally self-insured employers with 50 or more full-time employees, including FTEs) will satisfy their reporting obligations using Forms 1094-C and 1095-C.

2016 Forms and Instructions
The following calendar year 2016 reporting forms and instructions are now available:

Information Reporting Deadlines
ALEs must furnish a Form 1095-C to each of its full-time employees by January 31, 2017. Forms 1094-C and 1095-C are also required to be filed with the IRS by February 28, 2017 (or March 31, 2017, if filing electronically).

Filers of Form 1095-B must furnish a copy of that form to the person identified as the “responsible individual” by January 31, 2017. The responsible individual is the person who, based on a relationship to the covered individuals, the primary name on the coverage, or some other circumstances, should receive the statement. Forms 1094-B and 1095-B are also required to be filed with the IRS by February 28, 2017 (or March 31, 2017, if filing electronically).

Please be advised that Forms 1095-B and 1095-C must be electronically filed if the reporting entity is required to file at least 250 of the specific form.

Visit our Information Reporting section for more on the information reporting requirements.

Paid Leave Bills Advance

supreme-courtOne of the biggest concerns of small business owners continues to be the paid and unpaid leave bills passing out of committee. In the Senate, the Healthy Workplace Act S.B. 2147 would require all employers to provide up to 7 paid sick days each year. The House passed H.B. 3297, creating the Employee Paid Health Care Time Act, requiring any employer of one or more to provide paid healthcare time at a rate of one hour for every 22 hours worked for an employer of 50 or more and one hour for every 40 hours worked for employers with fewer than 50 employees.

The Federal Government isn’t the only governmental body pushing paid leave. Several states and even the City of Chicago are considering paid leave for a variety of hardships, from bereavement to bone marrow and organ donations. A 2015 survey by NFIB shows that the vast majority of small businesses already offer some type of paid leave, with many offering up to 2 weeks per year.


Should You Consider a Minimum Value Plan?

If you’re in an industry with significant turnover and varied work schedules, a Minimum Value Plan may be an affordable way to meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act.

A Minimum Value Plan is one that pays at least 60% of the total allowed cost of benefits expected under the plan. And while a traditional fully insured plan might cost $300 per month for employee-only coverage, a minimum value plan may cost just over $100 while still providing ACA-mandated care and coverage for inpatient hospitalization.

Determining Minimum Value

Businesses may need help determining that their plan reaches “minimum value” under the ACA. To meet this standard, the plan must pay at least 60% of the total allowed cost of benefits, which can be a moving target. Recent regulations also require that minimum value plans must offer substantial coverage for both inpatient hospitalization and physician services.

It should also be noted that minimum value plans must still offer “minimum essential coverage” and coverage that is considered “affordable” under the ACA. Offering such a plan, without meeting these requirements, may still expose your organization to liability under ACA employer shared responsibility rules.

Though minimum value plans can be an affordable solution, future growth may be a concern, since only organizations with fewer than 50 full-time employees and full-time equivalents are exempt from ACA coverage requirements.

Overtime Rules Tough on Small Business

overtimeNew rules mandated by the Department of Labor could affect many small businesses, driving up labor costs and creating more red tape. These rules, effective on December 1, 2016, raise the salary threshold for eligible workers from $23,660 to $47,476 and to $134,004 for highly compensated employees. This means that salaried workers earning less than $47,476 will now be eligible for time-and-a-half for every hour they work beyond 40 hours per week. While the rules were intended to help millions of workers, they assume that every business will absorb the increased costs and pay overtime, rather than limiting hours for salaried employees.

Research by the National Federation of Independent Business shows that nearly half of all small businesses will be affected by the mandate. NFIB foresees a slowdown in productivity if salaried employees are forbidden from exceeding 40 hours per week. Another concern is that some employees may be converted from salaried to hourly, effectively receiving a demotion.

The rules also include a mechanism to automatically update the salary and compensation levels every three years in order to ensure that they continue to provide useful and effective tests for exemption.

Get More from Your Healthcare Spend

spendWith research showing that the average cost of healthcare surpassed $11,000 per employee in 2015, stretching every healthcare dollar is a must. Since self-funding is the foundation from which so many cost control strategies emerge, we encourage you to take this step if you haven’t already done so.

Understand the Needs of Your Group

Since every employer group is unique, it’s imperative that you look closely at demographics, prior claims and medical conditions. The availability of meaningful data is one of the biggest advantages of a self-funded plan, and key to making sure that those with chronic conditions such as diabetes or hypertension are receiving the treatment and attention they need. If your administrator isn’t helping in this critical area, you have the wrong administrator!

Coordination Matters

Self-funded health plans involve several parts that need to be working together. If you think healthcare is complex, put yourself in the shoes of your members and their families. Programs such as utilization review, hospital pre-certification, disease management and healthcare coaching can go a long way in managing costs. Services like patient advocacy and telemedicine can help members get the care they need in an efficient setting. For example, while office visits cost about $130, a telemedicine visit can be equally effective at a cost of about $40. With so many variables available today, it’s easy to see why customer service and care coordination are as important to your bottom line as they are to your employees.

Education and Wellness

Once a self-funded plan design and professional administration are in place, employee education and wellness integration must follow. Few factors influence healthcare costs more than lifestyle choices and the need to make informed buying decisions. And whether it involves understanding benefits or choosing a high quality, efficient provider, studies show that members need more support. To help in this area, many TPAs are integrating online access to comparative data on costs and providers.

When you consider that we can only manage what we can measure, delivering meaningful information to members, when they need to make a healthcare decision, should result in happier, healthier employees and lower costs for all.